Welcome to Pet Vet on Patton - Asheville's Premiere Animal Hospital

Opening Hours : Mon-Fri: 7:30 to 6 | Thurs: 7:30 to 6:30 | Sat: 9 to 7

Asheville Pet first aid Basic procedures

Asheville Pet first aid Basic procedures

Emergency treatment and first aid for pets should never be used as a substitute for veterinary care. But it may save your pet’s life before you can get your pet to the Pet Vet on Patton. Asheville Pet first aid.

2

Poisoning and Exposure to Toxins
Poisoning is a pet emergency that causes a great deal of confusion for pet owners. In general, any products that are harmful for people are also harmful for pets. Examples include cleaning products, rodent poisons and antifreeze. But you also need to be aware of common food items that may be harmful to your pet. The AVMA brochure Household Hazards offers a summary of what foods and common household items may pose a danger to your pet.

If your pet’s skin or eyes are exposed to a toxic product (such as many cleaning products), check the product label for the instructions for people exposed to the product; if the label instructs you to wash your hands with soap and water if you’re exposed, then wash your pet’s skin with soap and water (don’t get any into its eyes, mouth or nose). If the label tells you to flush the skin or eyes with water, do this for your pet as soon as possible (if you can do it safely), and call us immediately at (828) 232-9990.

Seizures
Keep your pet away from any objects (including furniture) that might hurt it. Do not try to restrain the pet.
Time the seizure (they usually last 2-3 minutes). After the seizure has stopped, keep your pet as warm and quiet as possible and contact us at at (828) 232-9990.

Heatstroke
Never leave your pet in the car on warm days. The temperature inside a car can rise very quickly to dangerous levels, even on milder days. Pets can succumb to heatstroke very easily and must be treated very quickly to give them the best chance of survival. If you cannot immediately get your pet to a veterinarian, move it to a shaded area and out of direct sunlight. Place a cool or cold, wet towel around its neck and head (do not cover your pet’s eyes, nose or mouth). Remove the towel, wring it out, and rewet it and rewrap it every few minutes as you cool the animal. Pour or use a hose to keep water running over the animal’s body (especially the abdomen and between the hind legs), and use your hands to massage its legs and sweep the water away as it absorbs the body heat. Transport the pet the Pet Vet on Patton as soon as possible.